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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 8, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. embarrassment for israel. its ambassador to the uk apologises after an embassy official is secretly filmed discussing how to "ta ke down" a conservative minister. the official told an undercover reporter that sir alan duncan was causing "lots of problems" for the israelis. and is seen describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an "idiot". good morning, it's sunday 8th january. also ahead: theresa may sets out her vision for britain. the prime minister says she wants to build a "shared society" with a commitment to fairness. london underground staff get ready to start a 24—hour strike tonight as millions of commuters face a chaotic start to the week. an iraq war veteran has been charged after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale
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airport in florida. in sport .. three premier league sides are knocked out by lower league opposition in the fa cup third round — among them bournemouth, who were beaten 3—0 by league one side millwall. and helen has the weather. a very similar day to yesterday, weatherwise. it is grey and misty with fog in a few localities first thing. the israeli ambassador has apologised for comments which appear to show an embassy employee plotting to bring down a government minister. undercover footage, filmed by middle east news network aljazeera, shows an israeli government employee saying he would like to take down the foreign office minister sir alan duncan. the video also shows the official insulting borisjohnson, as jane—frances kelly reports. the emergence of the footage is highly embarrassing for the israelis.
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it shows shai masot dining with, among others, an aide to the conservative education minister robert halfon. mr masot, a senior political adviser at the israeli embassy, says he would like to bring down a member of the british government. sir alan duncan has been a fierce critic of israeli policy. just over two years ago, he described israel's control and division of the west bank city of hebron as nothing short of apartheid, where palestinians were treated as second—class citizens. in the covert footage, mr masot also describes sir alan's boss, borisjohnson, in less than flattering terms. sir crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee, described mr masot‘s comments about sir alan as outrageous and deserving of investigation. ina the director of the conservative friends of israel said we utterly
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aaaaaaaaaa condemn any attempt to undermine sir alan duncan, or any minister or any member of parliament. in a statement, the foreign office said: a while the british government is not taking any further action, the film raises uncomfortable questions about mr masot, and just how much influence he has been able to wield. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. theresa may is promising to introduce wide—ranging social reforms, to correct what she calls the "everyday injustices" faced by ordinary working families. in an article for the sunday telegraph, she says she wants to build a "shared society", with a commitment to fairness, and reveals a deliberate attempt to break away from her tory predecessors. our political correspondent, susana mendonca joins us now. susanna, what do you think she means by a "shared society? it is ata
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it is at a leader ed miliband about assured society back in 2015. to reason me is about in terms of stop focusing on the individual but to look at the responsibilities we have for one another and she said in the past governments have failed do that and she wants to be a focus. that distance is from previous conservative leaders. david cameron talked about the big society which is about charities with injustice. if you look at margaret thatcher she said that there was no such thing as society and it was very much about individual sought to may moving in a different direction to her predecessors but the liberal democrat leader tim fallon has said he isa democrat leader tim fallon has said he is a hollow words and he does not believe that she wants to deal with injustice. we do not know if she
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will be putting more money into any specific policies at this stage and it is quite vague at this stage. why is she talking about this? she was to distance the discussion away from brexit and she does not want to be defined by that and also have domestic policy. we will find this week if the supreme court rules in favour of parliament in initiating article 50 and she has criticism from positions including nicola sturgeon who says she has no plan for. the brexit. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew marr show, to be shown later this morning, the first minister said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum if the terms of brexit were not right. they will be making a big mistake if they think i'm in any way bluffing.
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if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told "don't leave the uk," here we are — we voted to stay in the eu and we were told voting no was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. labour is calling on the prime minister to approve a £700 million emergency cash injection to help the nhs through the winter. it comes after the british red cross claimed there was a "humanitarian crisis" in hospitals in england. the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, said mrs may needed to ensure that "this year's crisis" never happened again. a 24—hour strike by london underground workers — affecting up to four million commuters — is due to start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses and the closure of ticket offices. transport for london says it's put a new deal on the table, but that's been rejected by the biggest rail union the rmt. let's give you a few more details of what could be a chaotic week for rail commuters in the south—east of england.
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the 24—hour london underground strike begins at 6pm tonight. widespread disruption is expected. the majority of central london tube stations will be closed. and it could be the first in a series of rail strikes this week. drivers on southern rail are due to walk out wednesday and friday. and there are a further three strikes planned for the week after on 2a, 25 and 27th january, which could mean yet more misery for passengers. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who's 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. it's emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her 805, was born in britain. our correspondent, gary o'donoghue has more from fort lauderdale. she was a mother, a grandmother, a great—grandmother and a wife.
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olga woltering was born in britain, but had lived in the united states for decades. she was on her way to join a cruise ship to celebrate her husband's 90th birthday. also among the dead was 57—year—old michael oehme, also heading for a cruise ship with his wife. she was shot, but survived. three others died in friday's carnage as the gunman used a semiautomatic weapon in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers. this is the man police have charged with causing death and serious injury, esteban santiago, a 26—year—old former member of the military with mental health problems. his aunt says he was never the same after returning from a tour of duty in iraq. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that santiago had told fbi agents that the government and the cia were forcing him to watch videos from the islamic state group. that prompted a mental health
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assessment, during which a gun was confiscated, but later returned. the fbi says mr santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. at this stage, they don't believe he was operating with any other individuals. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. figures obtained by the bbc have revealed a 40% increase in ambulance call—outs to england's jails in the last three years. last year, an ambulance was called out every 45 minutes. 2016 saw the worst disorder in british prisons for two decades, with critics of the ministry ofjustice blaming overcrowding and staff cuts for increases in violence, drug overdoses
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and suicide attempts. while ambulances are sometimes called when an inmate is sick, they are also needed to respond to these incidents. the bbc asked every ambulance trust in england to find out how often they have been called to one of the 117 jails in england between january and october last year. the figures show during that time, 10,000 ambulances were needed. that is one on average every 45 minutes, twice the number it was five years ago. paramedics have told the bbc that this is putting an increased strain on services. the justice secretary, liz truss, has promised to spend £1.11 billion on new prisons and says she will provide an extra 2000 prison officers. emma forde, bbc news. you can hear more about this on bbc 5 live investigates today at 11.
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the average household in the uk now has a record amount of unsecured debt — almost £13,000. officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling, but the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone. we are seeing a sharp increase in the level of household debt and household debt other mortgages is up to nearly £30,000 per person. we're expecting to see a slowdown in wages and increasing inflation next year which means households could find it harder to service those debts and payoff d e bts harder to service those debts and payoff debts that all. margaret thatcher famously said there was "no such thing as society" —
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david cameron championed his plans for a "big society". now theresa may has changed tack — by talking about her vision for a "shared society" instead. but what does she mean exactly? let's talk to political expertjon tonge. what this theresa may mean by a shared society? she is repudiating what margaret thatcher and david cameron both said about big government being a bad thing. she said this morning that government should not get out of the way when people of problems and should intervene that is very different from the big society vision of david cameron which looked at the volu nta ry cameron which looked at the voluntary sector to sort out people's problems and is very different from the free—market vision in which the murky will take ca re of vision in which the murky will take care of problems that margaret thatcher articulated. —— the murky. ——market. this reiterates what
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theresa may said on the steps of downing street about black people having problems in prison and working class people not getting on in university. can the government afford to intervene? it looks as if the age of this territory has come toa the age of this territory has come to a conclusion and the government has abandoned its spending targets so has abandoned its spending targets so the way is clear that the government to intervene as theresa may suggest. as far as that our specifics they are about making housing affordable that will mean a big housing building programme and every su ccess ive big housing building programme and every successive government has cut back on social housing building in recent times. also with ending melt the health stigma that is a lack of policy detail. —— ending mentor health stigma. —— mental health stigma. we have heard about similar things from labour. this is a
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statement that tony blair would have been happy to make. he talked about shared society and the third week the government intervene sometimes and also used other elements of the free market. jeremy corbyn would find much of what theresa may says difficult to objective. it is very difficult to objective. it is very difficult to objective. it is very difficult to argue against what theresa may has articulated. which by minister is ever in favour of unfairness? she thought about a meritocracy in society but how will she implement this? —— prime minister. watch is looking to do this morning is to create the notion of theresa may —ism. and very different rebranding of the conservative party. the problem for her as she risks being defined by brexit. she says she is interested in social reform and she argues that
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the vote for brexit was bought for those who felt dispossessed and felt society was against them. critics say she should be concentrating on brexit and not get sidelined sidetracked with these other issues. she will have no choice between now and march not to concentrate on brexit and she will have a bill this week —— a decision from the court. we're still waiting for her verdict on whether we should stay in the european single market are not. she's had the biggest entry in british political history and what is surprising is she has articulated any sort of vision beyond brexit. how will donald trump ‘s tweets go down? there will be some sigh of
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relief that donald trump has said some nice words about theresa may. his previous tweets were about making nigel farage ambassador. presumably they will get on like a house on fire. here's helen with a look at this morning's weather. not as cold as it was across central and eastern europe and we had heavy snow in greece yesterday. the temperature in moscow today is minus 20. our concern with high—pressure round is the fog. this was in staffordshi re round is the fog. this was in staffordshire a few years ago —— a few hours ago. the morning started
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off with a bright bit of cloud sitting on the hills and fog at fairly low levels. icy patches also concern. less rain and drizzle and yesterday in the south and the worst at that more coming for scotland as we head into the afternoon. that is courtesy of a weather front of the war star to bring the change that ben was talking aboutjust then. we have big changes the weather for the next few days. east of the grampian still a bit of brightness around today and in northern ireland predominantly clouded. also for eastern parts of northern england in north—east wales but the emphasis will really be on cloud today and just let less grey than yesterday. still here. it stays mild for the evening and overnight so more mistake or foggy conditions by the morning. for northern ireland and scotla nd morning. for northern ireland and scotland and wet and windy rush hour and we will have severe gales for them and she is. once the rain
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clears through it will be replaced by blustery showers. ——minches. showers will be mentally in the hills. -- showers will be mentally in the hills. —— went the hills. we the day with perhaps another day or two of relatively mild weather from wednesday or thursday onwards, though it turns much colder. it will feel bitterly cold in the strong wind and it will bring with it some snow showers. 2016 saw the worst disorder in british prisons for two decades — and there are signs the problems are putting pressure on emergency services.
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figures obtained by the bbc have revealed a 40% increase in ambulance call—outs to england's jails in the last three years. last year, an ambulance was called out every 45 minutes. to find out more, we'rejoined by 5live investigates presenter adrian goldberg. these figures come from our freedom of information mist your colleagues made. —— request. we found that there were more than a thousand call—outs a month to every prison, a couege call—outs a month to every prison, a college of an ambulance every 45 minutes to jail college of an ambulance every 45 minutes tojail in college of an ambulance every 45 minutes to jail in england. in some cases that may be because the prisoner has fallen sick or a prison officer or a visitor to the jail but we also know this is against a background of rising incidence of violence in prison and a background of significantly rising incidents of self harm and present. i think that is very little doubt underlying this
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this is a reflection of real issue that the is a disorder inside jails. it isa that the is a disorder inside jails. it is a high profile ones were heard about this evidence suggests that this lot goes on. the present birmingham is one example i spoke to paramedic cold out there who talked about the difficulty when you're in that jail of getting into about the difficulty when you're in thatjail of getting into the jail because it is a victorian prison and being allowed in step—by—step and needing a prison officer every step of the way and then went prison officers say they accept the need to ta ke officers say they accept the need to take a president to hospital not necessarily having the right number of staff to then take out that prisoner and accompanied the paramedic to hospital because they are not enough staff there. that means an ambulance is being kept inside the jail which might otherwise be back on the streets helping ordinary people. it is certainly not by any means restricted to those prisons where there have been high—profile incidents. you get the figures but then you talk to people who are
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actually able to put it down to what is the impact for the emergency services. they have to deal with patients from all walks of life and also i presume within prisons and on the staff. we have been speaking to a paramedic who complains that he cannot get his prisoners to pro—hospital quickly enough. because that are not sometimes enough prison staff to help. but also to prison doctor was kept a diary for this detailing some of the quite horrific incidents going on behind bars. we're talking about rising incidents of self harm and violence against prison officers but also now this added element of psychoactive drug cold spice which seems to be very widely available which is creating a whole set of problems and violence of its own. the government says it is investing £1.3 billion in prisons and they are recruiting another two and they are recruiting another two and half thousand prison officers. you can hear more about this on bbc
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5 live investigates today at 11. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the reverend sally hitchiner is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we'll speak to her in a minute, first let's look at the front pages. the mail on sunday features israel's plot to take down tory minister. this undercover video. they call it a bombshell footage filmed in a london restaurant showing a senior diplomat making the astonishing threat to target alan duncan. the sunday telegraph — may: now it's the shared society, not the big society. she declares that the government has
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a duty to intervene and correct burning injustices in modern britain. the observer — may urged to get a grip on nhs as winter crisis spirals under increasing their share to offer a rescue plan. sunday express: trump's eu envoy is a brexiteer. he declares i love the uk. the newspaper says his appointment is expected to be a nice within days and he says britain would move to the head of the queue for trade deal with the united states. let's
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picture sally about what is inside the papers. let's pick up the story and the son. —— with the sun. i lived as a man for three years but i wa nted lived as a man for three years but i wanted a baby so i got a spam madonna from facebook. —— sperm doner. this is about transgender young man who's been accepted as transgender. he has been accepted for harm on treatments to be signed agenda he knows years. -- assigned to the gender. he had some eggs frozen before his treatment and got a dollarfrom frozen before his treatment and got a dollar from internet frozen before his treatment and got a dollarfrom internet to be at
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sperm doner. the newspaper has treated this appallingly. i run a support group which is called diverse church which is for lgbt christians. many people do not understand the tra nsgender christians. many people do not understand the transgender is not as binary and people can be whole spectrum of identifying factors. that can seem very confusing if you never come across that before. those of us who've known transgender people can say we can see the massive difference when somebody is supported with the gendered identify with computer when they are not. if they are not given support and recognition that is the risk of mental health problems and suicide. as long as this baby is love what does it matter? as long as it is a healthy baby what is matter whether its parent is male orfemale? the way that the newspaper has dealt
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with it. attitudes have changed to so with it. attitudes have changed to so many things in recent years but seemingly not here. not for the generalist in the sun. this is not representative of all sorts of people that i normally know somebody who is transgender who would be appalled by the treatment of this young man by a major national newspaper. particularly someone who is an honourable group generally with mental health problems. —— vulnerable. i have no idea whether this person has mental health problems that in general transgender people are addressed from that. we need to highlight that people have moved on and is more tolerance and a cce pta nce moved on and is more tolerance and acceptance in society than ever. your next choices from the observer. a scottish pioneer whose plans for a basic income could transform the uk. what is the idea? the idea is based
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ona number of what is the idea? the idea is based on a number of things. matt care is picking up on research. —— kerr. the idea is that every single human being should have a base level income so fewjobs up or down or you lose yourjob you're not very low paid jobs government should subsidise it to our basic level. this is supported by people both left and the right. it has been tried in canada and in finland. some dutch cities are looking to give the trial and have had successful small—scale trials. what this has the potential to do is give people a level of security that maybe means they can invest in small businesses and they can take risks and opportunities to grow in the running come and it does not leave people at risk of basic poverty. in a sense we
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provide that to an extent with the welfare state in the uk but this will not be hand—outs, it will be an income. and the idea is if you can top that up you will make more bit ofa top that up you will make more bit of a gadget will still get a basic level. food banks across the country are populated with people who are working but are facing a gap in the benefits to top up the basic income when they are working. we are facing a crisis in the welfare system today so a crisis in the welfare system today so anything that can be put on the table to be looked at seems positive from my perspective. there is a story in the sunday times. the man who got getty to save sally able orphans. —— sally able. —— sarajevo. sister agatha managed to persuade
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our philanthropist to give millions of pounds to get children out of sarajevo in the 1990s. sister agatha has used a persuasive power for good. that is a story saying that the queen is well enough to go back to church this morning. we can all breathe a sigh of relief that she seems to be recovering from her cold and all seems to be well and the world. we wish her well. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. coming up in the next half hour... we'll be speaking to the explorer sir ranulph fiennes live in the andes, as he bids to become the first person in history to cross both polar caps — and climb the highest mountain on every continent. stay with us — hadlines coming—up.
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—— headlines. good morning, it is 830 and this is brea kfast good morning, it is 830 and this is breakfast with sian lloyd and ben thompson. dumbing upa thompson. dumbing up a full weather forecast for you but first a summary of the headlines. the israeli ambassador to the uk has apologised after an embassy employee was recorded discussing a plan to bring down a government minister. the footage filmed shows the official saying he would like to take down the foreign
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office minister sir alan duncan. the video shows the minister insulting bodice to. the british government said it considers the matter closed. —— insulting bodicejohnson. theresa may promises to in situ wide—ranging social reforms to, the wide—ranging injustices facing families. she said she wants to build a shared society with a commitment to families. this is seen as a deliberate attempt to break away from previous conservative prime ministers. what the government will try to do is bring people together, david cameron said let's get charities involved in local groups doing the things the state used to do, what theresa may is saying is left to their own devices that does not necessarily work. nicola sturgeon insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect ofa is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew
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marshall the first minister said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum the terms of brexit were not right. it will be making a big mistake if they think i am in any way bluffing because of that comes to the .2 years after scotland had been told, the quote in the independent referendum was scotland to leave the uk, leads the uk, we voted to stay in the eu, we were told that voting now was the only really could stay in the eq and now we face being taken out and that creates a fundamental question for scotland. a 24-hour strike by london underground workers that will affect 4 million commuters will start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses. transport for london city have put a new deal on the table but it has been rejected by the rmt. let's give you some more details. the 24—hour london underground strike at six o'clock tonight.
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widespread disruption is expected, the majority of central london tube stations will be closed. there will also be a limited service on other tube lines in and out of london. this could be the first in a series of real strikes, drivers on southern railway are due to walk out on tuesday wednesday and friday. there area tuesday wednesday and friday. there are a further three strikes — the 23rd 24th and 27 which could mean yet more misery for passengers. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at the fort lauderdale —— at fort lauderdale. he could face the death penalty if found guilty. prosecutors say they still do not know why he chose fort lauderdale, it has emerged that one victim, a woman in her 805, was born in britain. the number of ambulances called to british pri5on5 has risen by nearly 40% in the last three years
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according to figures seen by the bbc. there were nearly 10,000 call—outs to the 117 jail5 bbc. there were nearly 10,000 call—outs to the 117 jails and young offenders institutions in the ten month5 offenders institutions in the ten months to october. government critics say staff numbers and overcrowding contributes to the problem. the ministry ofjustice said it planned to invest £100 million in prisons. the average household in the uk has a record amount of unsecured debt. officials at the bank of england maintain that debt levels are falling but the tuc which analysed official figures say it shows families are struggling to get by on the pay alone. we are seeing a sharp increase in the level of household debt, personal debt to a record high of nearly £13,000 per person. we are worried about that because we expect to see a slow—down in wages and an increase in inflation next year which means that households could find it harder to service those debts and pay off the
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debts they all. it isjust before 835, time for the sport. big upsets this weekend. always big upsets because that is what we want! the premier league teams come in as the little ones come in and pick them off because they are not quite expecting what the lower league teams have in store. a great victory for millwall over bournemouth, and wayne rooney a record equalling weekend for him. millwall produced the biggest upset of the third round and it was done at a canter as the beat bournemouth 3—0. a completely different starting off into the last game but millwall won it easily and the manager said he is proud of such a dominant display in his side. the manager said he is proud of such a dominant display in his sidelj enjoyed it. the boys have really ha rd enjoyed it. the boys have really hard thursday and friday is going to stop bournemouth and nullify the threats. we knew that we were
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capable of making chances so we are delighted. it was clinical at times. west brom was that derby, this free kick gave derby the 2—1win so delight for the away side in the 5000 travelling fans as well. and the third premier league side humbled yesterday was stoke, championship side walls with the 2—0 win and another free kick, matt doherty with the strike and it is the first time in eight seasons at stoke have gone out in the first road —— third round. stoke have gone out in the first road -- third round. we did not start the right manner and found it difficult to shake ourselves out of that. that is not what is required, you need to be ready to go from the off. it is a disappointment because it was a competition that we targeted and by the said we had a good starting 11 but unfortunately weren't able to do the job. the two
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non—league teams will be in the fourth round job —— draw. first is lincoln city, the had been leading ipswich 2—1 thanks to two strikes, before the championship side equalised to send the tie to a replay. and sutton united are also in the draw for the fourth round, they will play afc wimbledon. it ended now nil. and wayne rooney record was the headline of manchester united's 4—0 win over redding. it was as 249 for the club, putting an equal with sir bobby charlton as united's all—time stop —— top goal—scorer. charlton as united's all—time stop -- top goal-scorer. it is amazing because everybody knows who the bobby charlton is and what he means for the history of the club and is the triple and for wayne rooney to
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score the same number of goals is fantastic. but again the best deal arrived. and somersaults for you from the other matches, —— and some results. barrow lost 2—0 at wycombe. bbc website has all of the goals for the third round for you. there are 5/3—round matches for you today, and more opportunities for upsets. chelsea take on peter rottweiler lunchtime liverpool play week to plymouth argyle. these players want success , plymouth argyle. these players want success, they want a chance, they wa nt to ta ke success, they want a chance, they want to take each chance they get in this historic turnaround and of course we will try everything to win it. it is all pretty exciting and i look forward to it. sur andy murray's winning streak of 28 atp
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tour matches is over after he lost the kacar open final to novak djokovic. he was serving for a match in the second set and saved three match points to force the file into a decider. the match lasted three hours but in the end it was novak djokovic who edged it. andy murray retains his number one rank.|j djokovic who edged it. andy murray retains his number one rank. i could not ask for a better start to the year, playing finals ace andy who's numberone in the year, playing finals ace andy who's number one in the world and who has beenin number one in the world and who has been in tremendous form, winning almost 30 matters in a row. it is unbelievable. it is a great performance from both of us, we push the turn it to the limit. and sur mo farah‘s the turn it to the limit. and sur mo fa rah‘s attempt to the turn it to the limit. and sur mo farah‘s attempt to win the great edinburgh cross—country or second time ended in disappointment. he struggles, finishing seventh in his first race of 2017. hopkins was beaten into second in a sprint
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finish. definitely a little behind, the last bit of training has not gone as well as i wanted it, but it isa gone as well as i wanted it, but it is a team event and i want to comment here and represent my country at tell the guys. i did a session and i knew from that that it was going to be hard day. mo farah admitting he was a bit behind on his training. i hope he picks! everyone is allowed to be a little bit behind. you think he sits on the sofa in his pyjamas eating quality street? but he is smiling about it all. he smiles about everything. he isa all. he smiles about everything. he is a remarkably sunny character. a big yearfor him in 2017, it is the world athletics championships in the liberty stadium in london where he won the double gold in 2012. —— at the olympic stadium. he will turn
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his attention to the marathon so a new leaf for mo farah. but get on with our training! new leaf for mo farah. but get on with ourtraining! —— new leaf for mo farah. but get on with our training! —— get on with that training. back injuly the explorer ranulph fiennes commenced his latest challenge by taylor and brea kfast to his latest challenge by taylor and breakfast to become the first person to cross both polar ice caps and claim the highest mountain on every continent. he has injured blizzards and temperatures of —30 in his quest to co m plete and temperatures of —30 in his quest to complete that remarkable feat and raise money for charity. he is standing by followers and will —— and we will speak to him in a moment. let's look at his journey. we intend to break the biggest of all we intend to break the biggest of a ll world we intend to break the biggest of all world records, the global reach, and cross both ice caps and climb all of the highest mountains. not just the north also bore, but the
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whole ice caps and all seven continental high mountains. 30 years now, and our enemy has a lwa ys 30 years now, and our enemy has always been the norwegians. they go for the same world records so we have to get there first. this time we hope to the big one. before i copied i want to 20 million for uk charities, notjust 18.3 for uk charities, notjust18.3 widget is for the moment. —— before i cop it. i am now officially on top
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of the summit of mount vincent, the highest point in antarctica. three cheers for ranulph! henpecked, ray! iam cheers for ranulph! henpecked, ray! i am delighted to see that ranulph fiennesjoins us live i am delighted to see that ranulph fiennes joins us live from the base of the mountain this morning. it is lovely to see you, thanks for joining us. we have been looking at some amazing pictures of your journey, the challenge so far. tell us journey, the challenge so far. tell us what lies ahead today. forgive me ifi us what lies ahead today. forgive me if i can't hear you terribly well, but i get the gist of it. this mountain which is immediately above us mountain which is immediately above us looks to me even worse than ever this dead, but then you know the trouble is i should have started
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doing this long time ago. looks even worse than ever rest dead. mane cutie who we work for, and all of the work that we do, we are hoping that those wonderful people who look at what you have shown will give towards this wonderful service. that is what we're it for but u nfortu nately is what we're it for but unfortunately there are one or two other people in the world, proper climbers, after the same thing. you spoke of your motivation for this that you are raising money for mary qora—— that you are raising money for mary q or a —— midi clearly, he said it isa q or a —— midi clearly, he said it is a huge challenge for you. tells what the challenges in argentina. the problem is that the winds are huge and known to be huge, and we have to wait and try and get a met report, maybe this morning, to see
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whether we can make a push for it, it'll probably take four days, crampons obviously because of the snow, and we must not be there when the big wind comes because people have died in the past because of the wind. we're hoping that the snow will help us. if we are successful we will then move on to the jungle mountain which is the highest mountain which is the highest mountain in australia, and then last but definitely not least, in may or june, the one which i have already tried unsuccessfully, had a big bad operation on my back, it should be all right and that is in alaska and thatis all right and that is in alaska and that is the north american continent. all others, flights, guides, everything else, is only possible for us, a wonderful business men in yorkshire, paul sykes and tmf the international company, they make it possible for
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us company, they make it possible for us to try and do this. you're vastly experienced, and you had some amazing achievements over your career. you spoke about the motivation for the charity but how are you finding it? how do you relish these challenges and what drives you on? i wish that i had started doing the whole thing, not justice started doing the whole thing, not just ice caps and everest, which was ten yea rs just ice caps and everest, which was ten years ago, the trouble is the passage of time as a bad effect on your body and this is a dam nuisance, pain in the neck. you have just got to keep trying hard, harder and harder, and as it tells you you have got to stop your god to do the next bit. just do it bit by bit. you mentioned imaging you had attempted in the past. it is a very dangerous
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mountain. you have another mountain to climb today but tells about mount du nalley to climb today but tells about mount dunalley and what lies ahead there. that one, really may and june is when you need to do it, when i tried we got up to 14,000 feet, which is a sort of basic tent camp, and my colleague mike stroud managed to find a crevasse in the middle of the camp, it is a very heavily crevasse mountain. we know that like this one the wind is absolutely important. before we could go on that occasion to the 17,000 foot high camp, a very shia area, i woke up in the morning with a very bad back pain. —— a very shia area. —— a very tender kenya.
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we said we will wait and do it again. i had a six—hour operation, deep steroids in the back and that would have sorted it out. we wish you the very best of luck, and today with your climb in argentina and the rest of the challenge. thank you for coming back on breakfast to tell us about how you have been getting an and we will follow it with interest. absolutely fascinating. best of luck to him and we will keep you updated on his progress. time to say goodbye to shine, you are off to read the news on andrew marr. but first he has a look at the weather. it is still a little bit foggy out there, certainly a slow improvement for many but we do have at least slightly brighter skies here today
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at saint davids in pembrokeshire. and in kent as well as a bit of la sunshine but that is limited looking at the satellite pictures so far as it goes at the moment. the best chances but at least in england and scotland. freezing fog across north—eastern england and a vial of your at the moment, i see as well as foggy. which in the day the reins backin foggy. which in the day the reins back in the west and north of scotla nd back in the west and north of scotland accompanied by severe gales. here the weather will the day goes on, a lot of cloud in northern ireland but mildly at least. there will be the odd glimmer elsewhere, we can't rule it out but on the whole it is another cloudy day. slightly less grey but still quite cloudy and mild at least, and it stays mild at least overnight. no real frost issues, again stays mild at least overnight. no realfrost issues, again it stays mild at least overnight. no real frost issues, again it will be murky over the hills but it turns progressively wet and windy for scotla nd progressively wet and windy for scotland and northern ireland. not
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pleasa nt scotland and northern ireland. not pleasant for tomorrow morning rush—hour. gradually as the day wears on that will wind further southwards with the rain into north of england and wales and by the end of england and wales and by the end of the day it arrives across the south east. a spell of wet and windy weather and behind the brighter skies return but wintry showers follow. it will be notably colder tomorrow in northern ireland in northern england and scotland, with snow certainly with the showers in the hills. from wednesday onwards i have been talking all morning about a northerly arctic winds setting in, it will bring snow showers and it will feel pretty better because of the strength of the wind which at times will reach gale force in the north east. —— it will feel pretty better. please do stay tuned here on the news channel and on the website. i prefer cold and sunshine to the file and mild weather. ifi file and mild weather. if i had to choose it would be that one. hollywood is gearing up for the
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golden globes, one of the biggest nights in the entertainment calendar. the ceremony is traditionally seen as an indicator of which fills will do well at the oscars. and there are plenty of brits hoping to get their hands on one of the awards. our correspondence has been looking at the contenders. this report contains flash photography. hollywood likes nothing better than talking about itself. this year it has gone a step further, singing and dancing. la la land's love interests are played by ryan gosling and emma stone, and the city of stars itself. you've never seen it? i've never seen it. oh, my. you know it is playing at the rialto? really? yes. the next contender for golden globes glory could hardly be more different. usually can take care of hisself. he good that way. moonlight, with six nominations, is a coming—of—age story. naomie harris plays a drug—addicted mother, and she thinks the industry
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is getting better at telling stories about people with colour. i think there is a fantastic level of diversity this year, and i think it is something that is so to be celebrated. and it is a shame that we have to... it almost seems so regressive to have these conversations about race, in 2017 now, that we are still fixated about that. we just want great movies, really. do you think there is a change this year? where do you think we stand? i think there is a change happening all the time. when i think about my career 25 years ago, and starting out, and how few actors there were to fill the very few roles for people of colour, the stories were just not the stories that people — didn't realise they were stories that people wanted to see. another story that continues to fascinate is that of the british royalfamily. claire foy has been showered with praise for her portrayal of the young elizabeth.
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what a role to take on. i know, what an idiot! do you know what the royals think of it? no, i wish i did. i was wondering if i might take danny into town? for what? a change. in tv, the bbc coproduction the night manager has four nominations. the adaptation of thejohn le carre novel has won praise from critics and audiences, to the delight of its star, tom hiddleston. when you make something, you never know when it's going to catch fire or ignite people's interests, but it seemed to. and that is testament to the writing ofjohn le carre. i think spy thrillers will be enduringly popular, and he is the master. riz ahmed is also up for his role in the hbo crime drama the night of. i think the reality of being caught up in a murder case,
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facing the slow wheels ofjustice, it is not a walk in the park. so far, there is no clear favourite to sweep the board this awards season, which just makes the golden globes, always keenly followed for clues as to oscars success, all the more intriguing. good luck to everyone nominated, and we will have full coverage of who wins what on breakfast tomorrow so true then for that. elsewhere overweight football fa ns true then for that. elsewhere overweight football fans are being offered the opportunity to get into shape with a specialist diet and training programme that is usually only available to players. football fa ns only available to players. football fans in training set up by academics in scotland has now being run by five english football clubs and hopes to expand to others. john ferguson waiter 22 and half stone
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before signing up and easier to tell us before signing up and easier to tell us all about it. good morning. sean, tell us what this scheme is because infor tell us what this scheme is because in for you tell us what this scheme is because inforyou in tell us what this scheme is because in for you in terms of your life and what you can do. it is a 12 week scheme whereby you go into the foot ball scheme whereby you go into the football club, it is run at the ground, by cultures, as you learn about health and diet and exercise each week that is not up into different sections. you do what classroom work, you learn about portion sizes, which is quite scary when you think what he used to eat and what you're supposed to eat, they are two different things. as they are two different things. as the course goes on you do more exercise and it is notjust the course, it is the friendships you make and what you carry on afterwards as well. it is a life changing experiences you buy into it. how is this different to a regular weight loss class? i imagine
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the association to the football club makes a difference. for me that was a big thing, being a swindon fan, playing football for swindon town in internment in scotland, that is what clicked for me. a lot of it is foot ball face clicked for me. a lot of it is football face and i think if you're into football that is what you want. it isa into football that is what you want. it is a great deal of losing weight. this is a picture of you before you took part. this is a 2015, you started that. a big transformation. we were talking earlier you can now do this, you will running every week, the remarkable transformation into a deep analogy. some of the guys there, we on a tuesday night and we have started a running club. it is something we set up yourselves after the course. it is brilliant. john, chantal pearson transformation for him, why the collaboration for
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the club? what makes a difference? association with the club is a major reason, the guise of a common interest in all football fans and come to the ground every evening. it is where they feel comfortable. they look at coming into the football clu b to look at coming into the football club to hopefully get on the track toa club to hopefully get on the track to a healthierfuture. club to hopefully get on the track to a healthier future. talk me through what you actually make them do. you put them through the food —— put them through their paces. do. you put them through the food —— put them through their pacesm do. you put them through the food —— put them through their paces. it is a12 put them through their paces. it is a 12 week course, a healthy lifestyle course, and there two elements. one educate and eating healthy and the second is increasing the physical activity. adding the two together we have had fantastic results but some of the topics we look at, the eat well, the portion size, one week on alcohol, overcoming barriers, setting smart goals, so there is an education element each week and sean said the physical activity increases week or week. it starts off all of the guys
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are givena week. it starts off all of the guys are given a pedometer. it is about increasing the baseline step count and then be set smart goals each week. as sean said after the weeks hopefully the guise of change the mindset and are on hopefully the pathway to a healthier future. sean was it the association with the football clu b was it the association with the football club that he/she going? times get tough on the forcing you to run and you want to give it up, if that would keep you going?l to run and you want to give it up, if that would keep you going? a lot of it is the group mentality. everybody encourages everybody. not everybody is a swindon fan who doesn't. but everybodyjoins together and you encourage each other. it is a great thing, like a team sport. you become a team. fascinating stuff. really good to talk to. best of luck. hopefully it will roll out everywhere. 2 from us on breakfast today, dan and louise
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are you tomorrow from six and i will cover the cheap strikes. —— the tube strikes. have a great day whatever it is now up to. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at nine. a political advisor at the israeli embassy has been secretly recorded saying he wants to "take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan — who's a strong critic ofjewish settlements. theresa may is promising a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the "everyday injustices" experienced by working families. nicola sturgeon says she's not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. the average amount of unsecured debt has reached a record high of almost £13,000 per uk household. heavy snowfalls and sub—zero temperatures are continuing
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across europe — causing more than twenty deaths — and bringing transport chaos.

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